Anantanand Rambachan participates in 100 Days, 100 Letters campaign

American Values, Religious Voices: 100 Days, 100 Letters is a national, nonpartisan campaign created from the conviction that scholars who study and teach our diverse religious traditions have something important to say about our shared American values. The project aims to contribute constructively to our national discourse, reaffirming who we are as Americans and modeling how we can learn from one another and work together for the common good.

From January 20 to April 29, 2021—Values & Voices will send a letter a day to our elected leaders in Washington and readers around the county, letters that will bring an array of religious texts and teachings to bear on our most pressing contemporary issues.

Our own Anantanand Rambachan, chair of the board of MnMN, contributed the letter for Day 5 of this campaign. To hear him read his letter and for the full text, click here.

For more letters and to read more about this campaign, click here.

 

Anantanand Rambachan is Professor of Religion, Philosophy, and Asian Studies at Saint Olaf College in Minnesota. Among his books are The Advaita Worldview: God, World and Humanity, A Hindu Theology of Liberation and Essays in Hindu Theology. Prof. Rambachan has been involved in interreligious relations and dialogue for over 30 years as a Hindu contributor and analyst. He serves as the President of the Board, Arigatou International NY, a global organization advocating for the rights of children and mobilizing the resources of religions to overcome violence against children. He is Co-President of Religions for Peace, the largest global interfaith network, and Chair of the Board of the Minnesota Multifaith Network.

Other Posts You May Be Interested In

Languages of Love

What one rural faith community did to increase religious literacy in Minnesota A line of rainbow-hued doors fronts the New Journey United Church of Christ

Read More »

Building an Interfaith Group

Drew Hoopes was becoming increasingly aware of the negativity and division he saw in the news and on social media. “That is not an accurate representation of our world. There are muted voices who want to build up, not tear down and divide,” says Hoopes.

Read More »